Freakishly Awesome Stuff

Freakishly Awesome Stuff

spacettf:

The Rosette Nebula and NGC 2239 18 February 2014 by Peter the Fraudfinder on Flickr.
spacettf:

baker north startrails 2 by Light of the Moon Photography on Flickr.
spacettf:

Sunset by Jack Andreasen on Flickr.
spacettf:

Hydra A: Black Hole Pumps Iron (NASA, Chandra repost, 09/14/09) by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr.Via Flickr: Hello Flickr friends! Feb. 20 is another lesser-known holiday: “Love Your Pet Day.” To celebrate, we looked up the top seven pets and searched for space images for each animal. I’m getting an early start tonight by posting this Chandra “Hydra” image in honor of #7 on the list: the crafty and often misunderstood snake. (That would be the Lernaean Hydra, not the simple, freshwater Hydra.)
As a bonus, check out this twisting, serpentine image of the Rio Negro floodplain in Patagonia, Argentina: www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/4358585360/in/photolis…
Any guesses for what animal will be #6 on the list of most popular pets? I’ll post the answer tomorrow morning.
Caption: This composite image of the Hydra A galaxy cluster shows 10-million-degree gas observed by Chandra in blue and jets of radio emission observed by the Very Large Array in pink. Optical data (in yellow) from the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope and the Digitized Sky Survey shows galaxies in the cluster.
Detailed analysis of the Chandra data shows that the gas located along the direction of the radio jets is enhanced in iron and other metals. Scientists think these elements have been produced by Type Ia supernova explosions in the large galaxy at the center of the cluster. A powerful outburst from the supermassive black hole then pushed the material outwards, over distances extending for almost 400,000 light years, extending beyond the region shown in this image. About 10 to 20 percent of the iron in the galaxy has been displaced, requiring a few percent of the total energy produced by the central black hole.
Outbursts from the central, supermassive black hole have not only pushed elements outwards, but have created a series of cavities in the hot gas. As these jets blasted through the galaxy into the surrounding multimillion-degree intergalactic gas, they pushed the hot gas aside to create the cavities. A relatively recent outburst created a pair of cavities visible as dark regions in the Chandra image located around the radio emission. These cavities are so large they would be able to contain the entire Milky Way galaxy, but they are dwarfed by even larger cavities — too faint to be visible in this image - created by earlier, more powerful outbursts from the black hole. The largest of these cavities is immense, extending for about 670,000 light years.
Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/U.Waterloo/C.Kirkpatrick et al.; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA; Optical: Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope/DSS

spacettf:

Hydra A: Black Hole Pumps Iron (NASA, Chandra repost, 09/14/09) by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Hello Flickr friends! Feb. 20 is another lesser-known holiday: “Love Your Pet Day.” To celebrate, we looked up the top seven pets and searched for space images for each animal. I’m getting an early start tonight by posting this Chandra “Hydra” image in honor of #7 on the list: the crafty and often misunderstood snake. (That would be the Lernaean Hydra, not the simple, freshwater Hydra.)

As a bonus, check out this twisting, serpentine image of the Rio Negro floodplain in Patagonia, Argentina: www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/4358585360/in/photolis…

Any guesses for what animal will be #6 on the list of most popular pets? I’ll post the answer tomorrow morning.



Caption: This composite image of the Hydra A galaxy cluster shows 10-million-degree gas observed by Chandra in blue and jets of radio emission observed by the Very Large Array in pink. Optical data (in yellow) from the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope and the Digitized Sky Survey shows galaxies in the cluster.

Detailed analysis of the Chandra data shows that the gas located along the direction of the radio jets is enhanced in iron and other metals. Scientists think these elements have been produced by Type Ia supernova explosions in the large galaxy at the center of the cluster. A powerful outburst from the supermassive black hole then pushed the material outwards, over distances extending for almost 400,000 light years, extending beyond the region shown in this image. About 10 to 20 percent of the iron in the galaxy has been displaced, requiring a few percent of the total energy produced by the central black hole.

Outbursts from the central, supermassive black hole have not only pushed elements outwards, but have created a series of cavities in the hot gas. As these jets blasted through the galaxy into the surrounding multimillion-degree intergalactic gas, they pushed the hot gas aside to create the cavities. A relatively recent outburst created a pair of cavities visible as dark regions in the Chandra image located around the radio emission. These cavities are so large they would be able to contain the entire Milky Way galaxy, but they are dwarfed by even larger cavities — too faint to be visible in this image - created by earlier, more powerful outbursts from the black hole. The largest of these cavities is immense, extending for about 670,000 light years.


Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/U.Waterloo/C.Kirkpatrick et al.; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA; Optical: Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope/DSS


The Perigee is the point in the moon’s orbit at which it’s closest to Earth
Photographed at midnight in Tuktoyaktuk, Canada by Francis Anderson (May 5th, 2012)

The Perigee is the point in the moon’s orbit at which it’s closest to Earth

Photographed at midnight in Tuktoyaktuk, Canada by Francis Anderson (May 5th, 2012)

(via scarlettwriter)

scificity:

Amazing R/C dalek at Gallifrey Onehttp://scificity.tumblr.com

scificity:

Amazing R/C dalek at Gallifrey One

http://scificity.tumblr.com

thenewenlightenmentage:

What Astronomers Are Still Discovering About the Big Bang Theory
A half-century after it was confirmed, the theory still yields new secrets
On a bright spring morning 50 years ago, two young astronomers at Bell Laboratories were tuning a 20-foot, horn-shaped antenna pointed toward the sky over New Jersey. Their goal was to measure the Milky Way galaxy, home to planet Earth.
To their puzzlement, Robert W. Wilson and Arno A. Penzias heard the insistent hiss of radio signals coming from every direction—and from beyond the Milky Way. It took a full year of testing, experimenting and calculating for them and another group of researchers at Princeton to explain the phenomenon: It was cosmic microwave background radiation, a residue of the primordial explosion of energy and matter that suddenly gave rise to the universe some 13.8 billion years ago. The scientists had found evidence that would confirm the Big Bang theory, first proposed by Georges Lemaître in 1931.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

What Astronomers Are Still Discovering About the Big Bang Theory

A half-century after it was confirmed, the theory still yields new secrets

On a bright spring morning 50 years ago, two young astronomers at Bell Laboratories were tuning a 20-foot, horn-shaped antenna pointed toward the sky over New Jersey. Their goal was to measure the Milky Way galaxy, home to planet Earth.

To their puzzlement, Robert W. Wilson and Arno A. Penzias heard the insistent hiss of radio signals coming from every direction—and from beyond the Milky Way. It took a full year of testing, experimenting and calculating for them and another group of researchers at Princeton to explain the phenomenon: It was cosmic microwave background radiation, a residue of the primordial explosion of energy and matter that suddenly gave rise to the universe some 13.8 billion years ago. The scientists had found evidence that would confirm the Big Bang theory, first proposed by Georges Lemaître in 1931.

Continue Reading

ohstarstuff:

via Imaginary Foundation
spacettf:

Galaxy up by Sergio Garcia Rill on Flickr.
a2zfilms:

"I dont think i’ll ever take a better photo than this in my entire life. I have the love of my life swimming under and wave and one of my best friends on a wave"
-Will Skudin

a2zfilms:

"I dont think i’ll ever take a better photo than this in my entire life. I have the love of my life swimming under and wave and one of my best friends on a wave"

-Will Skudin

(via scarlettwriter)

spacettf:

Running out of moonlight by Matt Champlin on Flickr.